College Course Descriptions

All nursing and health science courses include the course number, semester hours, prerequisites, and a course description. The semester is 16 weeks unless otherwise noted.
 
Course descriptions for all cluster courses are available through Student Services or the providing institution.
 
Students are required to meet with their Academic Advisor for course approval and to follow the curriculum plan for their specific program.
 
NOTE:     The Dean of Nursing & Health Sciences may approve additional courses.


COURSE ABBREVIATION KEY

BHS Bachelor of Science in Health Sciences
CMU Clinical Make-Up Unit
HCE Health Career Exploration
RES Respiratory Care
NUR Nursing
RT Radiography
 

 
BHS 300 EDUCATION PRINCIPLES IN HEALTH CARE – 3 SH
Education Principles gives students the basics of androgogical theory for use in planning, implementation, and evaluation of employee training and development.  The course emphasizes the learning process, reinforcement, and monitoring success.  Principles and practices of organizational learning, performance, and change will be addressed, as well as methods of educating the health care consumer.
3 Credit Hours Didactic (Hybrid)
 
BHS 301 HEALTH CARE DELIVERY SYSTEMS – 3 SH
Health Care Delivery Systems provides a historical perspective of the growth and development of the dynamically changing health care systems in America.  The current status and future of these complex systems will be assessed and analyzed, along with the respective professional and allied health roles that are vital to continued success.  The impact of the political, legislative, and economic forces on health care systems will be examined.
3 Credit Hours Didactic (Hybrid)
 
BHS 302 HEALTH CARE LEADERSHIP – 3 SH
The Health Care Leadership course presents didactic concepts preparing the student for leadership and management responsibilities.  Management concepts basic to management (planning, organizing, leading, and controlling) will be presented.  Strategies for managing a diverse workforce will be explored.  Theories of leadership and motivation, as well as conflict management, change, politics and power will be presented.  The health care manager’s role in the interdisciplinary health care team will be discussed.
3 Credit Hours Didactic (Hybrid)
 
BHS 303 MANAGERIAL COMMUNICATION – 3 SH
Co-requisite or Pre-requisite: Health Care Leadership
Managerial Communication will give the student the opportunity to strengthen both written and oral communication skills that are necessary to be successful in leadership and managerial situations.  Knowledge from general education communication courses will be used and applied specifically to routine managerial varieties of written communication documents and oral presentations.  Professional formats for memos, reports to superiors, white papers, and accreditation documents will be developed.  Common management oral presentation skills practiced will be conducting staff meetings, introducing departmental change, motivating employees in small and large groups, and giving effective employee feedback.
3 Credit Hours Didactic (Hybrid)
 
BHS 410 HEALTH SCIENCES RESEARCH – 3 SH
Pre-requisite: Statistics
The Health Sciences Research course provides an introduction to the theoretical foundation for scientific investigation, the research process, contributions of research to the Allied Health Professions, and the impact of research on historical, current, and future trends.  Major emphasis is on the application of the research process for use in practice as well as the process of critiquing research.  Various types of research and research methods will be addressed.  The health professional’s role in research, including the rights and responsibilities toward human subjects and additional legal-ethical concerns are discussed.  Evidence based practice and using research in the practice settings are stressed.  Statistical knowledge and qualitative analysis from the required general educational math courses will be integrated.
3 Credit Hours Didactic (Hybrid)
 
BHS 411 ETHICS FOR HEALTH CARE PROFESSIONALS – 4 SH
Pre-requisite: College level ethics
This course examines the influence of ethical and moral principles of behavior and the ethical decision-making process.  Opportunities are provided in this course to foster development of the ethical decision-making process through case studies and comparison of institutional practices.  This course will heighten awareness of ethical health care practice, fostering improved decision-making, and resulting in a better understanding of health care issues.
4 Credit Hours: 3 Didactic, 1 Field Study (Hybrid)
 
BHS 412 ACCOUNTING BASICS FOR HEALTH PROFESSIONALS – 3 SH
Accounting Basics includes an overall explanation of financial accounting terminology, review of financial reports, income statements, balance sheets, budgets, and cost reports.  It is intended that this course develop health care professionals with an appreciation for and understanding of the financial implications of operational and strategic management.  Case studies will use examples from hospitals, long term care facilities, and home health care to prepare students to read, analyze, use, and understand financial statements and budgets.
3 Credit Hours Didactic (Hybrid)
 
BHS 419 CLINICAL INTERNSHIP – 4-6 SH
Pre-requisite: All courses in the BSHS program; or
Co-requisite: Health Science Research Seminar
Students will complete a four to six hour internship with a health care manager or educator.  The Clinical Internship is designed to give the student the opportunity to apply previously learned didactic knowledge in the health care setting.  The student will apply leadership skills, managerial communication, and accounting basics in the clinical setting.  Radiographers have the option of completing a clinical internship in Computed Tomography RT 331 or Cardiovascular Interventional RT 332.
1 Credit Hour equates to 48 contact hours (Hybrid)
 
BHS 420 HEALTH SCIENCE RESEARCH SEMINAR – 4 SH
Pre-requisite: Introduction to Research
This course is designed to demonstrate higher level thinking processes in health care practice.  Concepts from general education and Health Sciences courses will be integrated.  A journal club format will be used to review current issues in the Health Sciences professions.  Students will conduct a literature review on a self-selected health care delivery issue and develop, implement, and evaluate a strategy to address that issue.
4 Credit Hours Didactic (Hybrid)
 
CMU 100
Clinical Make-up Unit 100 is a course designed for students requiring clinical make-up hours for a Nursing or Health Sciences course with a clinical component. Clinical make-up will be held at a predetermined date and time designated by course faculty and will be conducted by a program-specific faculty member. Students enroll based on days of clinical make-up required. CMU 100, a non-credit course, is a half day of clinical make-up time. This make-up time may be scheduled for an evening, night or weekend shift. It is the student’s responsibility to adjust their schedule to meet the predetermined dates/times/shifts. Refer to the specific course syllabus for CMU registration guidelines. Refer to Tuition and Fees for charges.
 
CMU 200
Clinical Make-up Unit 200 is a course designed for students requiring clinical make-up hours for a Nursing or Health Sciences course with a clinical component. Clinical make-up will be held at a predetermined date and time designated by course faculty and will be conducted by a program-specific faculty member. Students enroll based on days of clinical make-up required. CMU 200, a non-credit course, is a full day of clinical make-up time. This make-up time may be scheduled during an evening, night or weekend shift. It is the student’s responsibility to adjust their schedule to meet the predetermined dates/times/shifts. Refer to the specific course syllabus for CMU registration guidelines. Refer to Tuition and Fees for Charges.
 
HCE 101 HEALTH CARE SYSTEMS AND CAREER EXPLORATION – 3 SH
Prerequisite: High school diploma/GED or junior/senior at participating high school.
Health Care Systems and Career Exploration is an in-depth exploration of health care careers and employment expectations to assist in health care education and career development decisions. History and overview of the health care industry and common health care safety practices will be explored through theory and a wide range of clinical experiences. Clinical shadowing experiences in a medical center as well as in community health care settings will provide the student with exposure to a wide range of health care career experiences and health system models. This course is open to undeclared students. See Health and Safety Record policy regarding requirements for clinical participation.
 
NUR 100-W MATH FOR CLINICAL PRACTICE – 1 SH
This course is designed for LPN’s who advance place into the second semester of the ASN program. Mathematical accuracy is a crucial component of modern nursing. This course will help the student become comfortable with medication and IV calculations. The course is designed specifically to help students improve their basic math skills and apply those skills to clinical practice. The course will offer step-by-step rules, explanations and examples, followed by practice problems and exercises that test and reinforce the student’s knowledge.
1 Credit Hour (Online)
 
NUR 101 THE ART AND SCIENCE OF NURSING PRACTICE - 8 SH
Co-requisite: Anatomy & Physiology I, Psychology and Oral Communication
The Art and Science of Nursing Practice presents didactic concepts and clinical/laboratory practice and clinical experiences emphasizing therapeutic nursing interventions, cultural awareness, technical nursing skills, and knowledge basic to nursing practice. Also discussed is the history of mental health nursing and contemporary practice, including practice models. Learning unfolds from the wellness/illness continuum emphasizing health promotion and holistic care. Learning focuses on assessment of basic human needs, including physiological needs such as hygiene, nutrition, oxygenation and urinary/bowel elimination and psychosocial needs such as self-esteem, spirituality, culture, and sexuality. The nursing process is utilized for assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation and teaching of the client and family. The concepts of caring, culturally competent care and various nursing roles are presented. Common health problems as they relate to mobility, sensory perception, and stress and adaptation are discussed. Basic health assessment, critical thinking/reflective thinking skills and techniques of medication administration are presented and practiced. The student will become comfortable with medication and IV calculations. Basic math skills will be reviewed and applied to clinical practice. Step by step rules, explanations and examples, followed by practice problems and exercises that will test and reinforce the student’s knowledge will be offered. The tasks associated with the development of a therapeutic interpersonal relationship are emphasized. Therapeutic communication skills will be practiced in the lab and clinical setting. Legal, professional standards and ethical principles related to nursing, the rights of clients and families, and the importance of the Illinois Nursing Practice Act and Rules are emphasized. In addition to the learning laboratory, clinical experiences occur in acute care client settings.
8 Credits: 6 Credits Didactic, 2 Credits Clinical/Learning Laboratory (1 Credit Mental Health)
 

NUR A101 THE ART AND SCIENCE OF NURSING PRACTICE - 7 SH
Prerequisites: Accelerated BSN students only
The Art and Science of Nursing Practice presents didactic concepts, clinical/laboratory practice and clinical experiences emphasizing therapeutic nursing interventions, cultural awareness, technical nursing skills, and knowledge basic to nursing practice. Also, discussed is the history of mental health nursing and contemporary practice, including practice models. Learning unfolds from the wellness/illness continuum, emphasizing health promotion and holistic care. Learning focuses on assessment of basic human needs, including physiological needs such as hygiene, nutrition, oxygenation and urinary/bowel elimination and psychosocial needs such as self- esteem, spirituality, culture, and sexuality. The nursing process is utilized for assessment, diagnosis, planning, implementation, evaluation and teaching of the client and family. The concepts of caring, culturally competent care and various nursing roles are presented. Common health problems as they relate to mobility, sensory perception, and stress and adaptation are discussed. Basic health assessment, critical thinking/reflective thinking skills and techniques of medication administration are presented and practiced. The tasks associated with the development of a therapeutic interpersonal relationship are emphasized. Therapeutic communication skills will be practiced in the lab setting. Legal, professional standards and ethical principles related to nursing, the rights of clients and families, and the importance of the Illinois Nursing Practice Act and Rules are emphasized. In addition to the learning laboratory, clinical experiences occur in acute care client settings.
7 Credits: 5 Credits Didactic (1 Credit Mental Health), 2 Credits Clinical/Learning Laboratory
 
NUR 102 ADULT HEALTH NURSING - 9 SH
Prerequisites: NUR 101, Anatomy and Physiology I, and Psychology Cluster Requirement and Oral Communication.
Co-requisite: Anatomy & Physiology II; Human Growth & Development
This course builds on the knowledge and skills from Nursing 101: The Art and Science of Nursing Practice, and Anatomy and Physiology I. Adult Health Nursing presents didactic concepts and clinical experiences to allow the student to apply the nursing process to the care of the adult client who is experiencing common health problems that are acute or chronic in nature as well as to clients with acute and chronic mental health needs and problems. Mental health problems dealing with cognition, mood, anxiety, and substance abuse are discussed. Learning is directed toward problems requiring therapeutic nursing interventions of a well-defined nature leading toward providing culturally competent care. The client is seen as a valued member of a family, social network, and community. Technical skills such as IV access, urinary catheterization, NG insertion, and dressing changes will be introduced. Interpersonal skills, communication skills (written and oral), family theories, group process and assessment skills are strongly emphasized. Previously learned technical skills will continue to be practiced and refined. Medication administration will continue to be emphasized. The concepts of nutrition, pharmacology, legal and ethical considerations and problem-solving are integrated. The course will introduce the student to the evolving roles of the nurse as a provider and manager of health care and as a member of the health care team. Clinical experience occurs in the acute care, peri-operative, medical surgical skilled nursing, mental health, and community-based health facilities.
9 Credits: 5.5 Credits Didactic (1.5 Credits Mental Health) and 3.5 Credits Clinical/Learning Laboratory (0.5 Credits Mental Health)
 
NUR A102 ADULT HEALTH NURSING - 9 SH
Prerequisites: Nursing A101 The Art and Science of Nursing Practice. Accelerated BSN students only.
This course builds on the knowledge and skills from Nursing A101, the Art and Science of Nursing Practice, and all prerequisite general education coursework completed prior to matriculation into the accelerated BSN program. Adult Health Nursing presents didactic concepts and clinical experiences to allow the student to apply the nursing process to the care of the adult client who is experiencing common health problems that are acute or chronic in nature, as well as to clients with acute and chronic mental health needs and problems. Mental health problems dealing with cognition, mood, and anxiety are discussed. Learning is directed toward problems requiring therapeutic nursing interventions of a well- defined nature, leading toward providing culturally competent care. The client is seen as a valued member of a family, social network, and the community. Technical skills such as IV access and care, CVAD, urinary catheterization, and sterile dressing changes will be introduced. Interpersonal skills, communication skills (written and oral), family theories, and group process and assessment skills are strongly emphasized. Previously learned technical skills will continue to be practiced and refined. Medication administration will continue to be emphasized. The concepts of nutrition, pharmacology, legal and ethical considerations and problem-solving are integrated. The course will introduce the student to the evolving roles of the nurse as a provider and manager of health care and as a member of the health care team. Clinical experience occurs in the acute care, peri-operative, medical surgical, and skilled nursing health care facilities.
9 Credits: 5.5 Credits Didactic (1.5 Credits Mental Health) and 3.5 Credits Clinical/Learning Laboratory
(0.5 Credits Mental Health)
 
NUR 200 HUMAN DISEASE PROCESSES – 3 SH
Prerequisites: NUR 101 or NUR A101; NUR 102 or NUR A102; NUR 212 or NUR A212; Anatomy & Physiology I; Anatomy & Physiology II and Microbiology.
Human Diseases Processes provides the student with a scientific background and understanding of pathophysiology as it relates to the assessment of diverse client populations. The course will emphasize functioning at the cellular level and will augment the student’s ability to correlate various disease states with clinical manifestations, common diagnostic tests and therapeutic, evidence-based nursing interventions. Disease processes such as fluid-electrolyte imbalance, homeostasis, hemodynamics, acid-base imbalance, infective disorders, immune disorders, and genetic considerations will be emphasized.
3 Credits: 3 Credits Didactic
 
NUR 201 LIFE SPAN NURSING I – 9 SH
Prerequisites: All first year nursing and general education courses. Concurrent enrollment in NUR 200, and Sociology.
Life Span I is the first of two courses that presents didactic concepts and clinical experiences that examine the health status of individuals throughout their life span. There is focus on health maintenance as well as management of acute and chronic health problems. Both the physical and mental health needs of the client are considered. There is an emphasis on family involvement, especially in the care of children. Culturally sensitive care giving and cultural maintenance are emphasized. The student will learn how to manage individuals and groups of patients with increasingly complex health issues. Clinical experiences are in the acute care setting as well as the community environment.
9 Credits: 6 Credits Didactic (0.5 Credits Mental Health, 1.25 Credits Pediatrics), 3 Credits Clinical/Learning Laboratory (0.5 Credits Mental Health and 0.75 Credits Pediatrics)
 
NUR 202 LIFE SPAN NURSING II – 8 SH
Prerequisites: All first year nursing and general education courses. All second year, first semester nursing and general education courses.
Life Span Nursing II is the second of two courses that presents didactic and clinical experiences that examine the health status of individuals throughout the life span. The focus is on health maintenance, management of acute and chronic health conditions and critical care, emergent care and neurological conditions. In addition, the course focuses on the transition of the learner into the practice role of the RN. The concepts of leadership and management will be provided and leadership/management skills will be applied in the clinical setting. Transitional testing will be completed in preparation for the national licensing examination.
8 Credits: 4 Credits Didactic (1.25 Credits Pediatrics), 4 Credits Clinical/Learning Laboratory (0.75 Credits Pediatrics)
 
NUR 203 MATERNAL – NEWBORN NURSING – 4 SH
Prerequisites: For ASN: All first year nursing and general education courses. NUR 200 and Sociology.
For BSN-A: All nursing courses from summer sessions I and II and fall semester. For BSN-B: All nursing and general education courses from first year, first summer session, and NUR 200 from fall semester.
Maternal and Newborn Health presents didactic and clinical experiences that emphasize families during childbearing. Pregnancy is considered a normal developmental occurrence; however, risk factors and selected health problems that may occur during the child-bearing experience are considered. The nursing process is utilized when giving nursing care during the antepartum, intrapartum, postpartum and neonatal periods. The social, cultural, economic, sexual, physiological and psychological aspects of childbearing are considered. Nutrition, pharmacology, legal standards, ethical principles, critical thinking, and communication are integrated. Historical aspects in relation to contemporary trends and issues are discussed. Physical assessment skills related to fetal well-being and the mother and newborn are presented. Clinical experiences include the birthing unit, mother-baby care in the acute care setting, as well as related community experience.
4 Credit Hours: 2.5 Credits Didactic, 1.5 Credits Clinical/Learning Lab.
 
NUR 212 PHARMACOLOGY – 1 SH
Prerequisites: All first year first semester nursing courses and general education courses. Concurrent enrollment in NUR 102. Requests to take this course prior to meeting all prerequisites must be made in writing and submitted to the course coordinator. The course coordinator will approve or deny the request by writing on the student request. A copy of the written request will be placed in the student’s academic file.
This hybrid course is designed to present the principles underlying pharmacology and their relationship to the registered nurse’s role in drug administration. This course builds on nursing skills, math, and the natural sciences (especially knowledge of anatomy and physiology) to explore the concepts of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. Emphasis is placed on how drugs are utilized and processed in the body, the body’s reaction to these drugs, and potential drug interactions. Further studies of major drug categories will be used with drug prototypes as examples of these basic concepts. The student will apply basic pharmacological principles to new situations in order to improve the effectiveness of drugs and prevent/minimize the complications of drug therapy. Course concepts include the principles of drug action and the nursing process as it applies to the therapeutic use of drugs (including safety and patient education).
1 Credit (Face to Face F2F)
 
NUR A212 PHARMACOLOGY - 1 SH
Prerequisites: NUR A101; NUR A102 concurrently.
This course is designed to present the principles underlying pharmacology and their relationship to the registered nurse’s role in drug administration. This course builds on nursing skills, math, and the natural sciences (especially knowledge of anatomy, physiology, and microbiology) to explore the concepts of pharmacokinetics, pharmacodynamics and pharmacotherapeutics. Emphasis is placed on how drugs are utilized and processed in the body, the body’s reaction to these drugs, and potential drug interactions. Further studies of major drug categories will be used with drug prototypes as examples of these basic concepts. The student will apply basic pharmacological principles to new situations in order to improve the effectiveness of drugs and prevent/minimize the complications of drug therapy. Course concepts include the principles of drug action and the nursing process as it applies to the therapeutic use of drugs (including safety and patient education).
1 Credit (Online)
 
NUR A213 PHARMACOLOGY - 1 SH
Prerequisites: NUR A101; NUR A102; NUR 200; NUR A212; NUR 302; NUR 411. Concurrent Enrollment in NUR202; NUR 203; NUR 303; and NUR 410.
This course explores the pharmacological treatment of various disease processes. The effects of medications, both therapeutic and adverse, on the human body are investigated.
1 Credit (Online)
 
NOTE: Prerequisites for All Nursing 300 and 400 Level Courses: Proof of RN Licensure from a State Board of Nursing or Permission of Faculty.
 
NUR 301 NURSING LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT – 3 SH
Leadership and Management presents didactic concepts preparing the student for leadership and management responsibilities. Management concepts discussed include organizational theory and structure, fiscal planning, delegation and managing human and material resources. Strategies for managing a culturally diverse workforce will be explored. Theories of leadership and motivation, as well as conflict management, change theory and persuasion and negotiation will be presented.
 
Additional concepts of power and authority, nursing care delivery systems, and quality improvement are addressed. The nurse’s role in the interdisciplinary health care team, health care delivery systems, critical thinking strategies, and decision-making processes are discussed and operationalized. Integrated concepts include communication principles and legal and ethical considerations. Opportunities and experiences are provided to foster development of leadership abilities and management skills for the learner. Fieldwork study experiences include contributions to a project, which enhances nursing quality, and role exploration of a nursing supervisor, case manager, and staff development nurse.
3 Credits (Hybrid and Field Study)
 

NUR A301 NURSING LEADERSHIP AND MANAGEMENT – 4 SH
Prerequisites: NUR A101; NUR A102; NUR 200; NUR 201; NUR A212; NUR 202; NUR 203; NUR A213; NUR 302; NUR 303; NUR 410; NUR 411
Nursing Leadership and Management presents didactic concepts preparing the student for leadership and management responsibilities. Management concepts discussed include organizational theory and structure, fiscal planning, delegation and managing human and material resources. Strategies for managing a culturally diverse workforce will be explored. Theories of leadership and motivation, as well as conflict management, change theory and persuasion and negotiation will be presented. Additional concepts of power and authority, nursing care delivery systems, and quality improvement are addressed. The nurse’s role in the interdisciplinary health care team, health care delivery systems, critical thinking strategies, and decision-making processes are discussed and operationalized. Integrated concepts include communication principles and legal and ethical considerations. Opportunities and experiences are provided to foster development of leadership abilities and management skills for the learner. Fieldwork study experiences include contributions to a project, which enhances nursing quality, and role exploration of a nursing supervisor, case manager, and staff development nurse.
4 Credits: 3 Credits Didactic, 1 Credit Clinical (Hybrid)
 
NUR 302 ADVANCED HEALTH ASSESSMENT – 3 SH
Prerequisites for Accelerated BSN: NUR A101; NUR A102; NUR A212; Concurrent enrollment in NUR200; NUR 201; and NUR 411
Advanced Health Assessment presents didactic concepts and clinical experiences related to advanced assessment and builds on knowledge from natural and social sciences, humanities, and nursing, including physical health assessment. The student is provided with the opportunity to develop and enhance advanced skills in interviewing and data collection, as well as systematically examining clients who are at various stages in the lifespan. Comprehensive assessment concepts and advanced techniques will be addressed using a system’s approach. A holistic emphasis to health assessment is used including cognitive, physical, psychological, nutritional, cultural, economic, spiritual and environmental considerations. Students will be provided the opportunity to expand communication skills through in-depth interviews of individuals. The didactic component emphasizes the nurse’s role as a member of the interdisciplinary team in health assessment. Clinical experiences occur in learning laboratory. Course expectations include fostering critical thinking and advanced psychomotor skills leading to the course outcome performance of a complete health assessment of an individual.
3 Credits: 32 Lab Hours (Hybrid) (2.33 Credits Didactic, 0.67 Credit (32 contact hours) Learning Laboratory)
 
NUR 303 NURSING PATHOPHYSIOLOGY – 3 SH
Prerequisites for Accelerated BSN: NUR A101; NUR A102; NUR 200; NUR 201; NUR A212; NUR 302; NUR 411
Co-requisite for Accelerated BSN: NUR 203; NUR A213; NUR 410
Nursing Pathophysiology focuses on alterations in physiologic mechanisms involved in disease. Topics for this course include mechanisms of disease, cellular biology, cell injury and death, neurological pathophysiology, cardiovascular pathophysiology, renal pathophysiology and endocrine pathophysiology. The etiology, pathogenesis, manifestations and nursing care for selected diseases will be presented. Evidence-based nursing practice will be emphasized.
3 Credits (Hybrid)
 
NUR 320 NURSING INFORMATICS – 3 SH
Nursing Informatics is a didactic course focusing on the use of computer science, information science and nursing science. Documenting, collecting and aggregating of data to make decisions related to culturally competent nursing care of patients will be emphasized. The course focuses on how technology supports clinical practice, research, education and nursing administration. In addition to presentations and discussions, field observation of select clinical and administrative systems will be scheduled along with hands-on practice with graphics, spread sheet and data base applications on personal computers.
3 Credits (Hybrid)
 

NUR A401 NURSING IN THE COMMUNITY -4 SH
Prerequisites for Accelerated BSN: NUR A101; NUR A102; NUR 200; NUR 201; NUR 202; NUR 203; NUR A212; NUR A213; NUR 302; NUR 303; NUR 410; and NUR 411.Concurrent enrollment in NUR A301
Community health nursing is a didactic and clinical course is designed for BSN-A students in their final summer term. It focuses on collaborative strategies to improve the health of populations. Public health concepts such as epidemiology, levels of prevention, and screening are applied to the study of communicable and chronic diseases as well as to the environment. Other major course topics include home care nursing, community and family assessment, provision of culturally-appropriate care to aggregates, and the historical and political aspects of nursing roles. The clinical experience includes delivering care to clients in the home.
4 Credits: 3 Credits Didactic; 1 Credit Clinical (Hybrid)
 
NUR 402 PROFESSIONAL ISSUES IN NURSING – 3 SH
This didactic course is designed to foster professionalism and the use of collaborative strategies to address nursing practice issues. Special attention is focused on the evolution of professional nursing and issues that impact current nursing practice. Nursing theorists and their organizing frameworks are presented. Health policy, financing, cultural/social competency and other timely issues will be discussed.
3 Credits (Online)
 
NUR 403 COMMUNITY HEALTH NURSING – 4 SH
Prerequisites: For BSN-B: All nursing and general education courses from first year and first summer session. For BSN-C: NUR 302; Statistics before or concurrent.
Community Health Nursing is a didactic and clinical course focusing on collaborative strategies to improve the health of populations. Public health concepts such as epidemiology, levels of prevention, and screening are applied to the study of communicable and chronic diseases as well as to the environment. Other major course topics include home care nursing, community and family assessment, provision of culturally appropriate care to aggregates, and the historical and political aspects of nursing roles. The clinical experience includes delivering care to clients in the home.
4 Credits: 3 Credits Didactic, 1 Credit Clinical (Hybrid)
 
NUR 410 TRANSCULTURAL NURSING – 3 SH
Prerequisites: For BSN-C: Anthropology or cultural anthropology before or concurrently. Cultural Anthropology preferred. For BSN-A: NUR A101; NUR A102; NUR A212; NUR 200; NUR 201; NUR 302; NUR 411. Concurrent enrollment in NUR 202; NUR 203; NUR A213; and NUR 303.
This course examines transcultural nursing concepts, theories and practices in relationship to human caring. Frameworks for performing a cultural assessment and for planning and implementing culturally appropriate nursing care are explored. Cultural influences on beliefs, values, and practices in relation to health, illness, and health-seeking behaviors are examined. This course provides opportunity for students to reflect on culture in relation to oneself and nursing practice roles.
3 Credits (Hybrid)
 
NUR 411 NURSING RESEARCH – 3 SH
Prerequisites: For BSN-C: Statistics; either Sociology or Cultural Anthropology before or concurrently. For BSN-A: NUR A101; NUR A102; NUR A212; NUR 200; NUR 201; and NUR 302. Concurrent enrollment in NUR 200; NUR 201; and NUR 302.
Nursing Research provides an introduction to the theoretical foundation for scientific investigation, the research process, contributions of research to the Nursing Profession, and the impact of research on historical, current, and future trends. Major emphasis is on the application of the research process for use in practice as well as the process of critiquing research. Various types of research and research methods will be addressed. The nurse’s role in research, including the rights and responsibilities toward human subjects and additional legal-ethical concerns are discussed. Evidence based nursing and using research in the practice setting are stressed. Statistical knowledge and quantitative analysis from the required general education math course will be integrated.
3 Credits (Hybrid)
 

NUR 412 GENETICS AND GENOMICS – 3 SH
Prerequisites: NUR 303
This BSN-C course is designed to provide an overview of inheritance patterns, discussion of genetic disorders and discussion of influence of heredity on the development of acute and chronic health problems throughout the life span, the effects of environment, culture, and behavior on the genetic makeup of individuals will be considered.
3 Credits (Hybrid)
 
NUR 413 GERONTOLOGICAL NURSING – 3 SH
Pre-requisites: None
This hybrid course provides the opportunity for the student to continue building a positive perspective towards the aging process and the older adult.  This didactic course focuses on the current status of attitudes toward the older adult, and theories of aging.  Myths and stereotypes of the older adult, utilization of support services by the older adult, and trends in gerontological nursing will be explored.  The interrelatedness of the biophysical and psychosocial alterations and health problems resulting from the aging process are studied. Health assessment, promotion of wellness, presentation of illness and nursing and pharmacological problems in the older adult will be discussed.  Additionally principles of teaching-learning and legal-ethical considerations will be applied to the special needs of the older adult.  The student evaluates issues of retirement, alternatives to institutionalized care, economic concerns, and legal-ethical issues related to the older adult.  Course expectations include examining current research related to gerontological nursing and the exploration of gerontological nursing case studies.
3 Credits (Hybrid)
 
NUR 420 SENIOR SEMINAR – 1 SH
Prerequisites: All courses in BSN curriculum before or concurrently. Must be taken in final term of semester.
This course provides a framework guiding an independent student paper/project which demonstrates integration, synthesis, and application of concepts from courses in the curriculum. Students will review the literature on a self-selected health care delivery issue and then develop a strategy to address that issue. Attainment of the BSN-Completion Program Goals will be assessed as part of this final course in the BSN-Completion curriculum.
1 Credit (Independent Project with Field Study)
 
NUR A420 SENIOR SEMINAR - 4 SH
Prerequisites: NUR A101; NUR A102; NUR A212; NUR 200; NUR 201; NUR 302; NUR 411; NUR 202; NUR 203; NUR A213; NUR 303; NUR 410; NUR A301; NUR A401. Concurrent enrollment in NUR 402
This course provides a framework for assisting students to integrate the BSN program goals. Students will select a nursing oriented clinical problem for exploration, review the related literature, and develop “strategies” to address the issue. A formal paper is written to present this information. The clinical component whereby the student works with a practicing RN in a “realistic” assignment, will assist in the transition from education to practice. Attainment of the BSN Program Goals and readiness for NCLEX-RN will be assessed through standardized testing and questionnaires.
4 Credits: 1 Credit Didactic; 3 Credit Clinical
 
RES 110 RESPIRATORY PROCEDURES – 5 SH
Prerequisite: Matriculation into the Respiratory Care Program.
This course provides theory, equipment operation and application with laboratory exercises in oxygen and other gas therapy; airway management techniques, humidity therapy, bland aerosol therapy, and aerosol drug therapy. An introduction to airway clearance modalities are also included.
4 Lecture Hours per week and 2 Lab Hours per week for 16 weeks.
 
RES 112 CARDIOPULMONARY ANATOMY AND PHYSIOLOGY – 3 SH
Prerequisite: Matriculation into the Respiratory Care Program
This course is a detailed study of the respiratory and circulatory systems as they apply to respiratory therapy. This course provides a foundation for the study of the respiratory and cardiovascular disorders and the interventions made to alleviate them. Mechanics of ventilation, respiration, gas transport, and neurologic control of ventilation will be stressed. The renal system will also be covered.
3 Lecture Hours per week for 16 weeks.
 
 
RES 114 INTRODUCTION TO RESPIRATORY CARE – 4 SH
Prerequisite: Matriculation into the Respiratory Care Program
This course introduces the student to the history of respiratory care, professional organizations, and trends affecting respiratory care. The student is provided with the necessary instruction and competencies to conduct a general head-to-toe patient assessment and documentation of assessment with an emphasis on the cardiovascular and pulmonary assessment. Review of math skills and an introductory to respiratory care pharmacology and respiratory diseases will also be included. Sterilization and disinfection of respiratory equipment, isolation techniques, medical terminology, and critical thinking are incorporated into this course.
4 Lecture Hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 120 RESPIRATORY PROCEDURES – 4 SH
Prerequisite: RES 110, RES 112, RES 114
This course provides continuation of concepts included in Respiratory Procedures I. Topics included are: arterial puncture and interpretation of arterial blood gases, non-invasive ventilation, and performance and evaluation of pulmonary function testing. Techniques used in the assessment of patient need for ventilatory support. The course also includes techniques utilized in airway care including suctioning, tracheotomy care and endotracheal intubation.
3 Lecture hours per week and 2 Lab hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 122 RESPIRATORY PHARMACOLOGY – 2 SH
Prerequisite: RES 110, RES 112, RES 114
This course places an emphasis on the drugs administered by the respiratory therapist. Topics include: general principles of pharmacology, dosage calculation, autonomic nervous system, bronchodilator therapy, corticosteroids, anti- asthmatics, cardiovascular drugs, and neuromuscular drugs.
2 Lecture hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 124 RESPIRATORY DISEASE – 2 SH
Prerequisite: RES 110, RES 112, RES 114
This course provides an in-depth discussion of diseases which affect the pulmonary system. Topics include the etiology, pathophysiology, clinical manifestations, and management of cardiopulmonary diseases.
2 Lecture hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 155 CLINICAL PRACTICE I – 4 SH
Prerequisite: RES 110, RES 112, RES 114
This course emphasizes physical assessment and the development of the ability to administer general patient care. The student refines skills in the administration of oxygen therapy, humidity and aerosol therapy, hyperinflation therapy, bronchial hygiene therapy, and chest physiotherapy. The student will also practice techniques associated with airway care, sampling and analysis of arterial blood gases, pulmonary function testing, and non-invasive ventilation. The student will also obtain exposure to the home care environment.
16 Clinical Hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 220 INTRODUCTION TO MECHANICAL VENTILATION – 2 SH
Prerequisite: RES 120, RES 122, RES 124
This course introduces the student to a knowledge base necessary for the management of mechanical ventilation to include: types of mechanical ventilators, modes of ventilation and problem solving of various ventilators.
8 Lecture hours per week for 4 weeks
 
RES 230 RESPIRATORY PROCEDURES III – 4 SH
Prerequisite: RES 220
This course further emphasize the skills involved in the management of mechanical ventilation to include: types of mechanical ventilators, modes of ventilation, blood               gas management and interpretation. Physiological effects of mechanical ventilation on the respiratory, cardiac, and renal systems will be covered. An introduction to pulmonary rehabilitation and fetal and neonatal development will also be included.
3 Lecture hours and 2 Lab hours per week for 16 weeks
 

RES 233 CARDIO PULMONARY MONITORING – 3 SH
Prerequisite: RES 220
This course places an emphasis on the monitoring and care of the patient in the critical care unit. Topics include: ventilator graphics, non-invasive monitoring, hemodynamic monitoring, and capnography monitoring. Interpretation and performance of electrocardiograms will also be covered. An introduction to pleural drainage systems and polysomnography will be included.
3 Lecture Hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 240 RESPIRATORY PROCEDURES IV– 4 SH
Prerequisite: RES 220, RES 230, RES 255
This course emphasizes all concepts learned in previous semesters, to include: patient assessment, treatment plans, therapist driven protocols, artificial airway management, ventilator management, analysis and evaluation of data obtained invasively and non-invasively. This course emphasizes neonatal and pediatric critical respiratory care. Congenital cardiac disease, neonatal and pediatric pulmonary diseases are covered along with fluid and electrolyte balance. Other topics included are ECMO, Nitric oxide administration and ACLS.
3 Lecture hours and 2 lab hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 250 RESPIRATORY SEMINAR – 3 SH
Prerequisite: RES 230, RES 233, RES 255
Respiratory seminar analyzes student strengths and weaknesses, reinforces key principles of previously studied content areas, and enhancement of problem solving skills. Preparation for the credentialing examinations is also included. A research project is required for completion of this course.
3 Lecture hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 255 CLINICAL PRACTICE II – 5 SH
Prerequisite: RES 220
This course emphasizes the care of patients in the critical care settings. The student continues to refine skills previously learned with the management of artificial airways. Continued development of skills to include: management of patients on mechanical ventilation, interpretation of ventilator graphics, and non-invasive and invasive monitoring.
20 Clinical Hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RES 275 CLINICAL PRACTICE III – 6 SH
Prerequisite: RES 230, RES 233, RES 255
This course emphasizes the integration of previously learned material from all semesters in the clinical setting. Emphasis is placed on critical care patients and their environment. The student will also practice skills in management of patients in the neonatal and pediatric setting.
24 Clinical hours per week for 16 weeks
 
RT 101 PRINCIPLES OF EXPOSURE I – 3 SH
Prerequisite: RT 121
Principles of Exposure I provides foundation knowledge required to understand the creation of the x-ray beam. Basic mathematics and units of measurement are reviewed. Radiation concepts including atomic theory are presented followed by electricity and electromagnetism; the groundwork to understanding control of the x-ray beam. Final units address x-ray equipment and production focusing on the role physics plays in creating the x-ray beam.
3 Lecture Hours per Week for 16 Weeks
 
RT 102 PRINCIPLES OF EXPOSURE II – 3 SH
Prerequisite: Fall Semester Year One in the Radiography Program
Principles of Exposure II provides the student with the foundation of radiographic exposure theory. Factors, which govern and influence the production of a radiographic image are presented and experiments conducted to reinforce the key concepts. Students will expand understanding of the interaction of radiation with matter. As a result, students develop the ability to analyze patients and determine appropriate exposure factors to produce a diagnostically valuable radiograph. The course incorporates the following aspects: creating the radiographic image, selecting optimal technical factors, determining/maintaining image diagnostic value, understanding and utilizing alternative exposure systems and methods.
3 Lecture Hours per Week for 16 Weeks
 
RT 121 PROCEDURES I – 3 SH
Prerequisite: Matriculation into the Radiography Program
Procedures I provides the student with the foundational principles of the Imaging Profession. The student will develop the skills required to perform standard radiographic procedures of the visceral torso to include chest, abdomen, and urinary systems. Communication and patient instruction are emphasized. Criteria for determining the successful production of required anatomical views is presented. Radiation protection is reinforced and monitored as a part of laboratory skills testing.
8 Lecture Hours and 2.5 Lab Hours per Week for 6 Weeks
 
RT 122 PROCEDURES II – 3 SH
Prerequisite: RT 121
Procedures II provides the student with the knowledge to construct and organize the steps necessary to  perform standard radiographic procedures of the gastrointestinal system and appendicular skeleton. Communication and culturally congruent patient instruction are emphasized. Criteria for determining the successful production of required anatomical views are addressed and applied. Radiation protection is reinforced and monitored as a part of laboratory skills testing.
2.5 Lecture Hours and 1 Lab Hours per Week for 16 Weeks
 
RT 123 PROCEDURES III – 3 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of Fall Semester Year One in the Radiography Program
Procedures III provides the student with the knowledge to construct and organize the steps necessary to perform pediatric, trauma and mobile radiographic procedures that were presented in RT122. The student practices the skills necessary to properly position specific anatomical structures of the bony thorax and cranium so that a diagnostically radiographic image is produced. The student applies technical concepts as criteria for determining the successful production of required anatomical views. Laboratory practice emphasizes culturally congruent communication, patient instruction, and radiation protection.
2.5 Lecture Hours and 1 Lab Hours per Week for 16 Weeks
 
RT 124 PROCEDURES – TRAUMA RADIOGRAPHY – 1 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of the Fall Semester, Year 1 of the Radiography Program
Trinity Radiography provides the student with the knowledge to construct and organize steps necessary to perform trauma radiographic procedures of the torso, extremities, spine, head, and facial bones. The student practices skills necessary to position the patient, the x-ray equipment and image receptor without causing undue harm to the patient while obtaining the required anatomical structures necessary to demonstrate the required anatomy. Emphasis is placed on patient assessment and communication, fractures and other traumatic injuries. Laboratory practice emphasizes critical thinking skills, multi-exam organization, image critique, radiation protection and culturally congruent patient care.
2 Lecture Hours per Week for 8 Weeks
 
RT 130 SECTIONAL IMAGING – 1 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of Summer and Fall Semesters, Year 1 of the Radiography Program
Sectional Imaging provides the basics of anatomy identification in the axial, coronal, and sagittal planes. The head, neck, thorax, abdomen, and pelvis are emphasized. Basic computed tomography equipment is introduced in preparation for clinical rotations in the computed tomography department.
2 Lecture Hours per Week for 8 Weeks (On-line)
 

RT 131 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS I – 4 SH
Prerequisite: RT 121
The student’s initial clinical experiences begin with observation and assisting with patients. The student becomes comfortable with equipment manipulation and familiar with routine protocols during the majority of first rotation objectives. Securing adult chest and abdomen competencies are a key area of focus. As the student progresses in the semester, opportunities to secure additional competencies of the visceral torso and appendicular skeleton are pursued.
17 Clinical Hours per Week for 15 Weeks
 
RT 133 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS II – 4 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of Fall Semester Year One in the Radiography Program
At this level of a student’s clinical education, confidence with basic equipment should be present. Retention and improvement of previously acquired competencies is monitored and evaluated. Emphasis is placed on non-routine and trauma imaging of previously learned material. Clinical experience expands as the student begins initial experiences in spine, bony thorax and cranial imaging and begins assignments in a variety of rotations.
17 Clinical Hours per Week for 15 Weeks
 
RT 140 PATIENT CARE – 2 SH
Prerequisite: RT 121
Patient Care provides the student with the basic skills required to appropriately care for patients within the clinical environment. Measures to assure infection control, patient safety, and confidentiality are stressed. The impact of disease processes on the needs of patients from newborn to geriatric is discussed, focusing on therapeutic communication and the holistic approach to care. Legal and ethical issues are addressed. Therapeutic communication skills are defined, modeled and practiced. The student in journal format records written observations of interactions with patients.
2 Lecture Hours per Week for 16 Weeks
 
RT 203 PRINCIPLES OF EXPOSURE III – 3 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of Year One in the Radiography Program
Principles of Exposure III emphasizes the basic principles of the interaction of radiation with living systems. Radiation effects on biologic molecules and organisms as well as factors affecting biological responses are presented. Short and long term radiation effects are discussed. Radiation protection responsibilities of the radiographer for patients, personnel and the public are emphasized. The concept of As Low As Reasonably Achievable (ALARA) is discussed and compared with Dose Equivalent Limit (DEL) concept. Regulatory agencies are identified and their involvement in radiation protection discussed.
3 Lecture Hours per Week for 16 Weeks
 
RT 204 SEMINAR – 3 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of Fall Semester, Year Two in the Radiography Program
Seminar analyzes student strengths and weaknesses, reinforces key principles of previously studied content areas, enhances problem solving skills, increases student comfort with the American Registry of Radiologic Technologists (ARRT) testing process and prepares students for entry into the profession.
3 Lecture Hours per Week for 16 Weeks
 
RT 205 RADIOGRAPHIC PATHOLOGY– 3 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of Year One in the Radiography Program
The study of Radiographic Pathology enables the student to develop an awareness of the symptoms and radiographic appearance of specific diseases. Understanding the additive and destructive impact of disease processes improves the radiographer’s accuracy in formulating appropriate exposure factors. Analysis of the diagnostic value of resultant images is enhanced. The ability to offer optimal patient care through an increased understanding of the physical and psychological changes a patient may be experiencing is a key area of focus.
3 Hours per Week for 16 Weeks (Hybrid)
 

RT 224 PROCEDURES IV – 3 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of year one in the Radiography Program
Procedures IV continues to address dedicated imaging studies. Contrast media, procedural techniques and specialized imaging equipment are emphasized. Vascular imaging and neuroradiography are primary areas of focus.
3 Lecture Hours per Week for 16 Weeks
 
RT 231 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS III – 3 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of Spring Semester Year One in the Radiography Program
The focus of Clinical Applications III is the student’s acceptance of and comfort with increased clinical independence. Mobile, surgery, and trauma experience is emphasized. Specialized rotations into advanced imaging modalities are assigned. Students begin patient case study assignments in special imaging areas. Students are expected to complete a minimum of 46% of all mandatory competencies.
32 Clinical Hours per Week for 6 Weeks
 
RT 232 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS IV – 6 SH
Prerequisite: RT 231
Clinical Applications IV focuses on the completion of a minimum of 70% of all required terminal competencies. The student is assigned a greater number of clinical hours which continues rotations to off campus clinical settings and special imaging areas such as computerized tomography, ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging, vascular imaging, orthopedics, surgery and mobile radiography. Assigned case studies continue as part of special imaging rotations.
26 Clinical Hours per Week for 15 Weeks
 
RT 233 CLINICAL APPLICATIONS V – 6 SH
Prerequisite: Completion of Fall Semester, Year Two in the Radiography Program
The focus of Clinical Applications V is 100% completion of all required terminal competencies and the demonstration of consistent independent capability in the performance of all documented competencies. Rotations and case studies in special imaging areas are completed. Competency in pediatrics, trauma, surgery, and mobile radiography to include alternative measures and technique modification must be documented.
26 Clinical Hours per Week for 15 Weeks.
 
RT 331 COMPUTED TOMOGRAPHY CLINICAL INTERNSHIP – 6 SH
Prerequisite: Certification in Radiography by the American Registry of Radiologic Technology (RTR) and acceptance into the University of Iowa CT Internship Program. IDPH and IEMA licenses required.
The Computed Tomography Clinical Internship course is designed to enhance the registered radiographer’s skills with the science and practice of computed tomography. The student completes competencies and objectives in the ARRT required CT categories of head, neck, spine/musculoskeletal, chest, abdomen, pelvis, and special procedures to include quality assurance and image display/post processing. Upon successful completion of the CT Clinical Internship the radiographer will have met the ARRT technical requirements to sit for the ARRT national certification examination in computed tomography.
640 Clinical Hours completed in a maximum of 20 consecutive weeks.
 
RT 332 CARDIOVASCULAR INTERVENTIONAL IMAGING CLINICAL INTERNSHIP – 6 SH
Prerequisite: Certification in Radiography by the American Registry of Radiologic Technology (RTR) and acceptance into the University of Iowa CVI Internship Program. IDPH and IEMA licenses required.
The Cardiovascular Interventional Clinical Internship course is designed to enhance the registered radiographer’s skills with the science and practice of cardiovascular interventional imaging. The student completes competencies and objectives in the ARRT required CVI categories of right and left cardiac heart catheterizations, angioplasty, atherectomy, thrombolysis, coronary angiogram, left ventriculogram, and hemodynamic measurements. Upon successful completion of the CVI Clinical Internship the radiographer will have met the ARRT technical requirements to sit for the ARRT national certification examination in cardiovascular interventional imaging.
640 Clinical Hours to be completed in a maximum of 20 consecutive weeks.
 
 

DIRECTORIES

GOVERNING BOARD

Benton Johnson II, Ph.D., Chair         
Dara Wegman-Geedey, Ph.D., Vice Chair
Radika Kolla, MD
Bobbi Lastrapes, MSEd
Randall Bay, MD
Todd Nicholson, BS, MBA
Krystle Jorgensen, RN, MSN, CNOR
Heidi Storl, Ph.D.
               

ADMINISTRATION

Lenore Knock, MEd

Director of Student Services and External Relations
AAS, Black Hawk College, Moline, Illinois
BA, St. Ambrose University, Davenport, Iowa
MEd, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
 

Tracy L. Poelvoorde, MS, RN

Dean, Nursing & Health Sciences
Diploma, United Medical Center School of Nursing, Moline, Illinois
BA, Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois
BSN, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho
MS, Idaho State University, Pocatello, Idaho
PhD(c), University of Northern Colorado, Greeley, Colorado
 

Lindsey Rives, BS

Executive Assistant
BS, Southern Illinois University, Edwardsville, Illinois
 

NURSING DEPARTMENT FACULTY

Teresa Cochran, MSN, RN

Adjunct Faculty
Diploma, Lutheran School for Nurses, Moline, Illinois
BSN, Clarke College, Dubuque, Iowa
MSN, Clarke College, Dubuque, Iowa
 

Karen Cummins, MS, RN

Assistant Professor
Diploma, Moline Public Hospital School of Nursing
BSN, Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa
MS, University of Illinois, Chicago, Illinois
 

Marcella Davis, MSN, RN

Instructor
Diploma, Lutheran School for Nurses, Moline, Illinois
BSN, Trinity College of Nursing & Health Sciences, Rock Island, Illinois
MSN, Kaplan University, Miami, Florida
 

Mary Ewald, MS, RN

Assistant Professor
BSN, Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa
MS, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
 

Renae Harroun, MSN, RN

Program Coordinator, ASN
Assistant Professor
BSN, Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa
MSN, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
 

Pam Hill, PhD, RN, CBE, FAAN

Program Coordinator, MSN
Professor
Diploma, Lutheran Hospital for Nurses, Moline, Illinois
BSN, Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa
MS, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
PhD, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
 

Angela Joers, MA, RN

Adjunct Faculty
BSN, Clarke College, Dubuque, Iowa
MA, Nursing, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
 

Christine Kessel, PhD, MSN, MA, CNE, RN

Professor
BSN, Boston College of Nursing, Chestnut Hill, Massachusetts
MSN, University of Connecticut, Storrs, Connecticut
MA, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
PhD, Capella University, Minneapolis, Minnesota
 

Cathy Konrad, PhD, RNC

Program Coordinator, Undergraduate Nursing
Professor
Diploma, Iowa Methodist Hospital School of Nursing, Des Moines, Iowa
BSN, Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa
MA, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
PhD, Illinois State University, Bloomington, Illinois
 

Regina Holly Lange, MS, RN

Adjunct Faculty
BSN, Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa
MS, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
 

Barbara Jean Minks, MSN, RN

Instructor
BSN, Clarke College, Dubuque, Iowa
MSN, Grandview University, Des Moines, Iowa
Kim E. Perry, MSN, APN, RNC
Assistant Professor
BSN, Husson College, Bangor, Maine
MSN, University of New York, Stony Brook, New York
 
 

Laurie Schultz, MSN, RN

Assistant Professor
Diploma, Lutheran Hospital School for Nurses, Moline, Illinois
BSN, University of Illinois at Chicago College of Nursing, Chicago, Illinois
MSN, University of Phoenix, Phoenix, Arizona
 

JoAnn Wedig, MA, RN

Associate Professor
BSN, Marycrest College, Davenport, Iowa
MA, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa
 

RADIOGRAPHY PROGRAM FACULTY

Diana Werderman, MSEd, RT(R)

Program Coordinator, Radiography
Program Coordinator, Bachelor of Sciences in Health Sciences
Assistant Professor
Diploma, Kewanee Public Hospital School of Radiologic Technology, Kewanee, Illinois
AAS, Black Hawk College, Moline, Illinois
BS, St. Joseph’s College, Standish, Maine
MSEd, Western Illinois University, Macomb, Illinois
 

Catherine DeBaillie, MSEd, RT(R)

Clinical Coordinator, Radiography
Associate Professor
Diploma, Moline Public Hospital School of Radiologic Technology, Moline, Illinois
AAS, Black Hawk College, Moline, Illinois
BS, University of St. Francis, Joliet, Illinois
MSEd, Capella University, Minneapolis, Minnesota
 

Jennifer Harl, MA, RT(R)

Instructor
Diploma, Trinity School of Radiologic Technology, Moline, Illinois
AAS, Black Hawk College, Moline, Illinois
BS, University of St. Francis, Joliet, Illinois
MA, Saint Xavier University, Chicago, Illinois
 

Deborah McClellan, RT(R)

Lecturer
Diploma, Mercy/St. Luke’s School of Radiologic
Technology, Cedar Rapids, Iowa
 

RESPIRATORY CARE PROGRAM FACULTY

William Brandes, MD

Respiratory Care Medical Director
MD, LSU School of Medicine, New Orleans, Louisiana
University of Florida – Residency Internal Medicine
University of Florida – Fellowship Pulmonary and Critical Care
 

Dana Boomershine, BS, RRT

Program Coordinator, Respiratory Care Instructor
BS, Midland Lutheran College, Fremont, Nebraska
 

Roger Ericson, MSEd, RRT

Respiratory Care Clinical Coordinator, Instructor
AAS, Black Hawk College, Moline, Illinois
BA, Augustana College, Rock Island, Illinois
MSEd, Walden University, Minneapolis, Minnesota
 

Carol Neely, MS, RRT RN

Assistant Professor
ASN, Madison Area Technical College, Madison, Wisconsin
BA, Western Illinois University, Moline, Illinois
MS, Western Illinois University, Moline, Illinois
 

ACADEMIC SECRETARY

Lori Graham

 

REGISTRAR

Cara Banks, MA

Registrar
BA, Illinois State University, Bloomington, Illinois
MA, Saint Xavier University, Chicago, Illinois
 

STUDENT SERVICES DEPARTMENT

Ellen Anderson

Bursar
 

Chris Christopherson, BS

Financial Aid Specialist
AA, American Institute of Commerce, Davenport, Iowa
BS, Business Management Kaplan University, Davenport, Iowa
 

Emily Myatt, AA

College Secretary
AA, Scott Community College, Bettendorf, Iowa
 

Mathew Oles, BA

College Educational Technologist/Web Specialist
BA, Teiko Marycrest University, Davenport, Iowa
 

Lori Perez, BA

Admissions Representative
BA, Northern Illinois University, DeKalb, Illinois
 

LIBRARIAN

Elizabeth Fox, MA, MS

Lead Librarian
MA, Western Washington University, Bellingham, Washington
MS, University of Illinois, Champaign, Illinois
 

Mary Vickrey, MLS

Librarian
BS, Briarcliff University, Sioux City, Iowa
MLS, University of Iowa, Iowa City, Iowa